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Geologic units containing tuff

Earth material > Volcanic rock > Pyroclastic rock
Tuff
Consolidated or cemented volcanic ash.
This category is also used for cinders.
Subtopics:
Welded tuff
Ash-flow tuff

Arkansas - Arizona - California - Colorado - Idaho - Louisiana - Massachusetts - Maine - Michigan - Montana - North Carolina - New Hampshire - New Mexico - Nevada - New York - Oklahoma - Oregon - Rhode Island - Texas - Utah - Virginia - Vermont - Washington - Wisconsin - Wyoming
Arkansas
Stanley Shale (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Mississippian-Early)
Stanley Shale - Includes Chickasaw Creek Chert equivalent of Harlton (1938) near top and Hatton Tuff Lentil and Hot Springs Sandstone Member near base
Arizona
Pliocene to late Miocene basaltic rocks (Late Miocene to Pliocene)
Mostly dark, inconspicuously flat, low-lying or mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Rocks included in this unit are located almost entirely in the large volcanic fields south and west of Flagstaff, in smaller fields in northwesternmost Arizona, and in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field on the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations north of Holbrook. Original volcanic landforms have been obscured by erosion. (4-8 Ma)
California
Devonian marine rocks, unit 2 (Eastern Klamath Mountains) (Devonian)
Limestone and dolomite, sandstone and shale; in part tuffaceous
Quaternary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 1 (Cascade Volcanic Field) (Quaternary)
Quaternary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Quaternary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 1, questionably identified (Cascade Volcanic Field) (Quaternary)
Quaternary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Quaternary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 5 (Coso Volcanic Field) (Quaternary)
Quaternary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 1 (Sonoma Volcanic Field) (Tertiary (3-7 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 2 (Berkeley Hills) (Tertiary (8-12 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 3 (Pinnacles-Neenach) (Tertiary (22-24 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 4 (Tranquillon-Obispo) (Tertiary (16-18 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 5 (Southern California Basin) (Tertiary (8-25 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 6 (Jacumba) (Tertiary (12-19 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 7 (Southern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary (8-28 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 8 (Northern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary (4-22 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 9 (Cascade Range) (Tertiary (2-24 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 15 (Southern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary (8-28 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 16 (Northern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary (4-22 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 3 (Sonoma Volcanic Field) (Tertiary (3-7 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 8 (Southern California Basin) (Tertiary (8-25 Ma; most near 15))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Colorado
Arikaree Fm (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Sandstone; contains abundant volcanically derived material
Basalt flows and associated tuff, breccia, and conglomerate of late-volcanic bimodal suite (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Includes basalts of Hinsdale Fm in San Juan Mountains - Servilleta Fm in San Luis Valley and many other occurrences
Dry Union Fm (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate. Includes Wagontongue Fm (Miocene) in South Park
Pre-ash-flow andesitic lavas, breccias, tuffs, and conglomerates (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Includes several named units
Idaho
Basalt flows, pumice, and tuff; Early Pleistocene to Pliocene basaltic volcanics; Snake River Plain (Early Pleistocene)
Lower Pleistocene to Pliocene basalts with associated tuffs and volcanic detritus.
Basalt flows, pyroclastic debris, clastic sediments, and diatomite; Pliocene basaltic volcanics and clastic sediments; Snake River Plain and vicinity (Pliocene)
Pliocene olivine basalt flows and associated tuff and detritus of southern Idaho.
Rhyolite ignimbrites, basalt flows, andesitic flows and tuffs, mudstone, conglomerate, and limestone; Quaternary to Tertiary volcanics and sediments; east-central Idaho (Pliocene)
Pliocene silicic welded tuff, ash, and flow rock; most common in southwestern Idaho.
Rhyolite ot trachyte ignimbrites and flows; Pliocene felsic volcanics; eastern Snake River Plain and vicinity (Pliocene)
Pliocene silicic welded tuff, ash, and flow rock; most common in southwestern Idaho.
Rhyolitic tuffs, ignimbrites, and flows, basaltic flows, conglomerate and marlstone; Pliocene to Miocene volcano-sedimentary deposits; eastern Snake River Plain and southeastern Idaho (Pliocene-Miocene)
Pliocene volcanic units, generally air-fall or pyroclastic in origin; grade into (Tpd).
Sandstone, conglomerate, siltstone, tuff, claystone, limestone, and diatomite; Pliocene tuffaceous alluvial and lacustrine deposits; Snake River Plain and vicinity, southeastern Idaho (Pliocene )
Pliocene stream and lake deposits; may be due to volcanic and block-faulting events.
Tuffaceous shale, sandstone, conglomerate, and lignite; Eocene to Pliocene alluvial and lacustrine deposits; central and southern Idaho (Tertiary)
Tertiary continental sediments; predominantly Upper Tertiary in age; subdivisions are:(Tpd, Tmd, and Ted).
Tuff, arkose, claystone, siltstone, conglomerate, lignite; Miocene alluvial and lacustrine deposits (Miocene)
Miocene stream and lake deposits; generally associated with volcanic episodes.
Louisiana
Carnahan Bayou Member (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene)
yellow to gray siltstones, sandstones, and clays with thin tuffaceous beds; some lenses of black chert gravel; petrified wood locally.
Massachusetts
Granby Basaltic Tuff (Lower Jurassic)
Granby Basaltic Tuff - Friable, well-bedded dark tuff, commonly incorporating sediment fragments. Assigned to Newark Supergroup (Robinson and Luttrell, 1985).
Lynn Volcanic Complex (Lower Devonian, Silurian, or Proterozoic Z)
Lynn Volcanic Complex - Rhyolite, agglomerate and tuff.
Mattapan Volcanic Complex (Proterozoic Z or younger)
Mattapan Volcanic Complex - Rhyolite, melaphyre, agglomerate, and tuff. Mattapan Volcanic Complex is found in west and southwest part of Boston basin and beyond, and to the south in Blue Hills. Similar in lithology to Lynn Volcanic Complex. Both units consist largely of partly porphyritic rhyolite and rhyodacite flows, welded ash-flow tuffs, vitric tuff, lapilli tuff, lithic tuff, flow breccias, breccia pipes, and extrusion domes. Mattapan's rhyolite and rhyodacites are thinner and less varied in composition and texture than Lynn's, and volcanic breccias are absent in Lynn. Both units are reported to lie nonconformably on Dedham Granite and unnamed plutonic-volcanic complex of eastern MA; however, Mattapan has been observed as dikes and stocks cutting Dedham Granite (Billings, 1976; Kaye and Zartman, 1980; Chute, 1966), and other workers have pointed out evidence that some of Mattapan may be penecontemporaneous with younger phases of Dedham batholith. Westwood Granite may be intrusive equivalent of Mattapan. Mattapan is conformably and fairly continuously overlain by Roxbury Conglomerate of Boston Bay Group. LaForge (19832) cautioned against identifying rocks interbedded within Mattapan that look like Roxbury, but are still part of Mattapan. Metavolcanic rocks in Blue Hills resembling Mattapan are assigned to Mattapan on State bedrock map (Zen and others, 1983); for years they were considered to be either Silurian and Devonian, or Carboniferous; however, they are chemically and mineralogically distinct from Ordovician and Silurian Blue Hills [sic] Granite Porphyry. Author follows usage of Chute (1966) who could find no difference between volcanic rocks in Blue Hills area and Mattapan rocks, and thus these rocks are assigned to Mattapan. Proterozoic Z age is based on U-Th-Pb zircon date of 602 +/-3 Ma (Zartman, in Kaye and Zartman, 1980). Although Billings (1979) questions reliability of zircon ages from volcanic rocks, discovery of Proterozoic Z acritarchs in overlying Cambridge Argillite indicates zircon age is appropriate (Goldsmith, 1991).
Nassau Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Nassau Formation - Dark-green to greenish brown, massive to well foliated stilpnomelane-chlorite-oligoclase-epidote metabasalt and basaltic tuff.
Newbury Volcanic Complex (Lower Devonian and Upper Silurian)
Newbury Volcanic Complex - Lower members. Basalt, andesite, rhyolite, and tuff.
Maine
Devonian Parker Bog Formation (Devonian)
Devonian Parker Bog Formation
Michigan
Menominee Group; Hemlock Formation (Early Proterozoic)
Menominee Group; Hemlock Formation - Predominantly mafic to intermediate volcanic flows and pyroclastic rocks with interlayered slate and tuff beds
Metabasalt (Late Archean) (Late Archean)
Metabasalt (Late Archean) - Derived from mafic to intermediate pyroclastic rocks and massive to pillowed lava flows. Unit mapped as Ramsey Formation by Prinz (1981) south of Gogebic Range; mapped as Mona Schist and Kitchi Schist in northern complex of Marquette District.
Montana
Arikaree formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Arikaree formation: gray sandstone with layers of concretions; contains volcanic ash and, locally, channels filled with conglomerate; known only in southeastern Montana.
Tertiary sedimentary rocks, undifferentiated (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Tertiary sedimentary rocks, undifferentiated: clastic deposits in western Montana, mostly in valleys, and in most places not divided into formations; mostly poorly consolidated gravel, sand, silt, and clay; includes some tuffaceous material and locally lenses of lignite and bentonite; a little hot spring tufa; and in areas not yet mapped in detail, lava may be included. These rocks were in part laid down in lakes but a large part was formed in streams and alluvial fans. These rocks are Tertiary in age and as now mapped may even include some beds of Cretaceous age. Some late Tertiary terrace deposits may be included.
North Carolina
Blowing Rock Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Blowing Rock Gneiss (1000 my) - unconformity; abundant white potassic feldspar megacrysts in finely banded biotite schist, locally calcareous; interlayered with quartz-feldspar schist, calcareous biotite schist, phyllite, black slate, calcareous quartzite, sulfidic greenstone, and siliceous tuff.
New Hampshire
Basalt (Cretaceous )
Basalt - Black, chiefly massive to porphyritic. Includes minor rhyolitic ignimbrite and andesitic tuff. Part of Ossipee Mountain Complex of Kingsley (1931)
New Mexico
Animas Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic Cenozoic | Cretaceous Tertiary)
Animas Formation; in northeast San Juan Basin
Bandelier Tuff (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary)
Bandelier Tuff; Jemez Mountains area only
Lower and Middle Santa Fe Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Lower and Middle Santa Fe Group. Includes Hayner Ranch, Rincon Valley, Popotosa, Cochiti, Tesuque, Chamita, Abiquiu, and other Formations; Miocene and uppermost Oligocene
rhyolitic pyroclastic rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Upper Oligocene rhyolitic pyroclastic rocks (ash-flow tuffs); includes Davis Canyon Tuff, South Crosby Peak Formation, La Jencia, Vick's Peak, Lemitar, South Canyon, Bloodgood Canyon, Shelley Peak Tuffs, tuff of Horseshoe Canyon, Park Tuff, Rhyolite Canyon Tuff, Apache Springs Tuff, Diamond Creek, Jordan Canyon, Garcia Camp Tuffs, the Turkey Springs Tuff, the tuff of Little Mineral Creek, the Amalia Tuff, and others. Some contain volcaniclastic and reworked volcaniclastic rocks, and eolian sandstone; (24-29 Ma)
sedimentary units, Palogene (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Paleogene sedimentary units; includes Baca, Galisteo, El Rito, Blanco Basin, Love Ranch, Lobo, Sanders Canyon, Skunk Ranch, Timberlake, and Cub Mountain Formations
silicic flows, domes, and associated pyroclastic rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Lower Oligocene silicic (or felsic) flows, domes, and associated pyroclastic rocks and intrusions; includes Mimbres Peak Formation
silicic pyroclastic rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Lower Oligocene silicic pyroclastic rocks (ash-flow tuffs); includes Hell's Mesa, Kneeling Nun, lower part of Bell Top Formation, Caballo Blanco, Datil Well, Leyba Well, Rock House Canyon, Blue Canyon, Sugarlump and Tadpole Ridge Tuffs, the tuffs of the Organ cauldron, Treasure Mountain Tuff (now known as Chiquito Peak Tuff), Bluff Creek Tuff, Oak Creek Tuff, tuff of Steins Mountain, tuff of Black Bill Canyon, tuff of Farr Ranch, Woodhaul Canyon, Gillespie and Box Canyon Tuffs, Cooney Tuff, and other volcanic and interbedded fluvial and pumiceous units; (31-36.5 Ma)
Nevada
Horse Spring Formation (Late Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
HORSE SPRING FORMATION-Tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, southern Nevada
Sedimentary rocks (Late Cretaceous to Oligocene)
SEDIMENTARY ROCKS-Includes Sheep Pass Formation (Eocene) and related units and unnamed tuffaceous sedimentary rocks
Tuffaceous sedimentary rocks (Late Eocene to Late Miocene)
TUFFACEOUS SEDIMENTARY ROCKS-Locally includes minor amounts of tuff
Tuffaceous sedimentary rocks (Early Oligocene to Early Miocene)
TUFFACEOUS SEDIMENTARY ROCKS-Locally includes minor amounts of tuff
New York
Greenstones and tuffs and/or basalt (Cambrian?)
Greenstones and tuffs and/or basalt
Oklahoma
Stanley Group or Stanley Shale (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Mississippian)
ARDMORE-SHERMAN- "Stanley Shale"- Shale, dark-gray, siliceous,with some gray to buff fine-grained sandstones; thickness,10,000 feet Occurs in the OUACHITA MNTS McALESTER TEXARKANA- "Stanley Group"- Shale, olive-green to gray, illitic, chloritic, with many5- to 30-foot-thick beds of poorly sorted, micaceous, quartzose sandstones and some thin siliceous cherty beds and black shales; several tuff beds occur in basal 1,000 feet and are indicated by red line in Stanley exposures as designated on map; many asphaltite, lead, and quartz veins occur along fault zones; mostly Chesterian age; thickness, 7,500 to 14,000 feet or more. Occurs in the OUACHITA MTNS SOUTH OF TI VALLEY FAULT
Oregon
Basalt and andesite (Miocene) (Miocene)
Lava flows and breccia of aphyric and plagioclase porphyritic basalt and aphyric andesite; locally includes flow breccia, peperite, some palagonite tuff and breccia, and minor silicic ash-flow tuff and interbeds of tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. In Basin and Range and Owyhee Upland provinces unit grades upward into more silicic, andesitic, and quartz latitic flows and flow breccia, as well as some interbedded tuffs and ash-flow tuffs; also in this region includes aphyric and highly porphyritic, plagioclase-rich basalt. Interfingers with and grades laterally into units Tit and Tts. Commonly contains montmorillonite clays, zeolites, calcite, and secondary silica minerals as alteration products on fractures and in pore spaces. Age, mostly middle Miocene, but includes some rocks of early Miocene age based on vertebrate fossils from related sedimentary units and on potassium-argon ages that range from about 13 Ma to about 19 Ma; most isotopic ages are about 13 to 16 Ma. Includes Steens Basalt (Steens Mountain Basalt of Fuller, 1931) Owyhee Basalt of Corcoran and others (1962) and Kittleman and others (1967), Hunter Creek Basalt and "unnamed igneous complex" of Kittleman and others (1965, 1967), and flows of Prineville chemical type (Uppuluri, 1974; Swanson and others, 1979), which previously were considered part of the Columbia River Basalt Group (Swanson, 1969a)
Basalt (Pleistocene and Pliocene) (Pliocene to Pleistocene)
Thin flows and minor flow breccia of open--textured (diktytaxitic) olivine basalt in southeastern part of map area. Locally contains thin interbeds of sedimentary rocks. Grades laterally through palagonite tuff and breccia into sedimentary rocks (unit QTs)
Basalt (upper and middle Miocene) (Middle to Late Miocene)
Basalt flows, flow breccia, and basaltic peperite; minor andesite flows; some interbeds of tuff and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. Basalt is aphyric to moderately porphyritic with phenocrysts of plagioclase and olivine and exhibits both subophitic and diktytaxitic textures. Includes Picture Rock Basalt of Hampton (1964), radiometrically dated by potassium-argon methods as middle(?) and late Miocene in age (see Fiebelkorn and others, 1983), flows of Deer Butte Formation of Kittleman and others (1967), and extensive unnamed flow sequences in the Basin-Range and Owyhee Upland Provinces of southern Lake, Harney, and Malheur Counties that are younger than Steens Basalt, dated at about 15 Ma (Baksi and others, 1967) and the Owyhee Basalt, dated at about 14 Ma (Bottomley and York, 1976; see also Fiebelkorn and others, 1983), and older than 7 or 8 Ma. Partly coeval with the Saddle Mountains Basalt of the Columbia River Basalt Group (Swanson and others, 1979)
Continental sedimentary rocks (upper and middle Miocene) (Middle Miocene to Late Miocene)
Poorly sorted and poorly bedded, fine- to coarse-grained tuffaceous siltstone, sandstone, pebble conglomerate, agglomerate, volcanic cobble conglomerate, air-fall tuff, and rare basaltic andesite flows equivalent to those in unit Tba. Included in the Miocene Sardine Formation by Peck and others (1964)
Fisher and Eugene Formations and correlative rocks (Oligocene and upper Eocene) (Late Eocene to Oligocene)
Thin to moderately thick bedded, coarse- to fine-grained arkosic and micaceous sandstone and siltstone, locally highly pumiceous, of the marine Eugene Formation; and coeval and older andesitic lapilli tuff, breccia, water-laid and air-fall silicic ash of the continental Fisher and Colestin Formations; upper parts of the Fisher Formation apparently lap onto and interfinger with the Eugene Formation. Megafauna in the Eugene Formation were assigned an Oligocene age by Vokes and others (1951) and foraminifers have been assigned to the upper part of the lower Refugian Stage (McDougall, 1980), or of late Eocene age. Basalt lava flows in the Fisher Formation have yielded isotopic ages as old as 40 Ma (Lux, 1982), and south of the latitude of Cottage Grove the Fisher is overlain by a welded tuff in unit Tu dated at about 35 Ma. North of Eugene, rocks of this unit are overlain unconformably by continental volcanogenic rocks of unit Tu, including an ash-flow tuff with a K-Ar age of 30.9 +/- 0.4 Ma
Lacustrine and fluvial deposits (Miocene) (Miocene)
Poorly to moderately consolidated, bedded silicic ash and pumicite, diatomite, tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, minor mudflow deposits, and some coarse epiclastic deposits. Vitroclastic material in some beds diagenetically altered to zeolites, secondary silica minerals, and clay minerals. In eastern Blue Mountains province vertebrate fossils indicate unit is mostly of late Miocene (Clarendonian) age, but may also include some rocks of middle Miocene (Barstovian) age. In High Lava Plains and northern Owyhee Upland provinces, vertebrate fossils indicate unit is partly late Miocene (Clarendonian), but probably is mostly middle Miocene (Barstovian) in age. Interfingers and grades laterally into unit Tmb. Includes lake and stream sediments and tuffaceous lake and stream deposits of Prostka (1962, 1967), Deer Butte Formation of Corcoran and others (1962) and Kittleman and others (1967), Juntura Formation of Shotwell and others (1963), some rocks originally assigned to the lower part of the (now obsolete) Danforth Formation of Piper and others (1939), and interbeds in upper part of Columbia River Basalt Group in northern Wallowa County
Marine sedimentary and tuffaceous rocks (middle Miocene to upper Eocene) (Late Eocene to Middle Miocene)
Tuffaceous and arkosic sandstone, locally fossiliferous, tuffaceous siltstone, tuff, glauconitic sandstone, minor conglomerate layers and lenses, and a few thin coal beds. Includes Scappoose Formation (Trimble, 1963; Wells and others, 1983), mudstone of Oswald West (Niem and Van Atta, 1973; Wells and others, 1983), Pittsburg Bluff Formation (see Wells and others, 1983), and Smuggler Cove and Northrup Creek formations (informal names) of Niem and Niem (1985)
Marine sedimentary rocks (middle and lower Miocene) (Early Miocene to Middle Miocene)
Fine- to medium-grained Marine siltstone and sandstone that commonly contains tuff beds. Includes the Astoria Formation, which is mostly micaceous and carbonaceous sandstone, and the middle Miocene Gnat Creek Formation of Niem and Niem (1985), which overlies Frenchmen Springs Member of the Wanapum Basalt east of Astoria. The Astoria Formation locally contains calcareous concretions and sulfide nodules; foraminifers in formation are assigned to the Saucesian and Relizian Stages (Kleinpell, 1938; Rau, 1981) and molluscan fossils to the Newportian Stage of Addicott (1976, 1981). Also includes Nye Mudstone, which is massive to poorly bedded siltstone and mudstone; foraminiferal assemblages assigned to the Saucesian Stage (Kleinpell, 1938; Rau, 1981) and molluscan fauna to Pillarian(?) Stage (Armentrout, 1981)
Marine sedimentary rocks (Upper Triassic? and Upper and Middle Triassic) (Early Triassic)
Black, green, and gray argillite, mudstone, and shale; graywacke, sandy limestone, tuff, and some coarse volcaniclastic rocks; chert, sandstone comprised of chert clasts, and chert pebble conglomerate; thin-bedded and massive limestone. Locally contains some interbedded lava flows, mostly spilite or keratophyre. In places metamorphosed. Invertebrate marine fauna indicates unit mostly of Late Triassic (Karnian and Norian) age. Includes the Begg and Brisbois Formations of Dickinson and Vigrass (1965; Vester Formation of Brown and Thayer, 1966) and the Rail Cabin Argillite of Dickinson and Vigrass (1965); Fields Creek Formation and Laycock and Murderers Creek Graywackes of Brown and Thayer (1966); Martin Bridge Formation and lower sedimentary series in and near the Wallowa Mountains (Prostka, 1962; Nolf, 1966); and Doyle Creek and Wild Sheep Creek Formations (Vallier, 1977). Probably partly age correlative with rocks of the Applegate Group (Wells and Peck, 1961) of southwestern Oregon
Rhyolite and dacite domes and flows and small hypabyssal intrusive bodies (Miocene to upper Eocene?) (Late Eocene to Miocene)
Mostly light-gray to red, dense, flow-banded, nonporphyritic and porphyritic rhyolite and dacite in nested domes, small intrusive bodies, and related flows. Includes some near-vent breccias, pumice-lapilli tuffs, and coarse pumicites. Commonly associated with mercury mineralization. Includes several small hypabyssal intrusions of diorite, granodiorite, and quartz monzonite exposed in Paisley Hills of Lake County (Muntzert, 1969; Muntzert and Field, 1968). In many places represents vents for lava flows and tuff of unit Tsf
Rhyolite and dacite (Holocene and Pleistocene) (Pleistocene to Holocene)
Domes and related flows and flow breccia of aphyric and plagioclase and hornblende porphyritic rhyolite and dacite. Includes rhyolite and dacite on Newberry volcano and at South Sister volcano in the Cascade Range that are younger than Mazama ash deposits (Qma , Qmp; radiometrically dated by 14C methods at approximately 6,800 yr old)
Rhyolitic tuff, tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, and lava flows (lower Miocene, Oligocene, and uppermost Eocene?) (Late Eocene to Early Miocene)
Rhyolitic to dacitic varicolored bedded tuff, lapilli tuff, and fine- to medium-grained tuffaceous sedimentary rocks with interstratified welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuff and interbedded basalt and andesite flows. Also includes minor rhyolite and dacite flows and domes. Glass in tuff and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks is commonly altered to zeolites, clay minerals, and small amounts of opal, chalcedony, orthoclase, and calcite. Fossil plants and vertebrates indicate an Oligocene and Miocene age. Locally a late Hemingfordian age indicated by mammalian fauna (Woodburn and Robinson, 1977). May include some rocks of middle Miocene age in the area west and northwest of Lakeview. Potassium-argon ages on rocks from unit range from about 36 Ma (Swanson and Robinson, 1968) to about 20 Ma. Includes Pike Creek Formation of Walker and Repenning (1965), originally identified as Pike Creek Volcanic Series by Fuller (1931), and unnamed volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of southern Lake County, some of which have been correlated with the Miocene and Oligocene Cedarville Formation of northeastern California
Sedimentary and volcaniclastic rocks (Tertiary)
Lapilli tuff, mudflow deposits (lahars), flow breccia, and volcanic conglomerate, mostly of basaltic to dacitic composition; rare iron-stained palagonitic tuff and breccia of basaltic and andesitic composition; and ash-flow, air-fall, and water-laid tuff of dacitic to rhyolitic composition. The palagonite tuff and breccia grade laterally into peperite and into lava flows of basalt and basaltic andesite
Sedimentary rocks (Jurassic) (Late Jurassic )
Black and gray mudstone, shale, siltstone, graywacke, andesitic to dacitic water-laid tuff, porcelaneous tuff, and minor interlayers and lenses of limestone and fine-grained sediments metamorphosed to phyllite or slate. Locally includes some felsite, andesite and basalt flows, breccia, and agglomerate. Marine invertebrate fauna indicates age range from Early Jurassic (Hettangian) to early Late Jurassic (Oxfordian). In Klamath Mountains of southwest Oregon, includes Galice Formation (Wells and Peck, 1961) and unnamed, hornblende- and (or) pyroxene-bearing clastic rocks of Jurassic age (Smith and others, 1982)
Sedimentary rocks, partly metamorphosed (Triassic and Paleozoic) (Paleozoic to Jurassic(?))
Poorly bedded argillite, chert, phyllite, phyllitic quartzite, calc-phyllite, impure limestone, and marble. In places rocks are strongly foliated. In Klamath Mountains of southwest Oregon, includes shale, mudstone, volcaniclastic sandstone, graywacke, conglomerate, tuff, and minor radiolarian chert and marble of the Applegate Group
Tuffaceous sedimentary rocks and tuff (Pliocene and Miocene) (Miocene to Pliocene)
Semiconsolidated to well-consolidated mostly lacustrine tuffaceous sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, concretionary claystone, conglomerate, pumicite, diatomite, air-fall and water-deposited vitric ash, palagonitic tuff and tuff breccia, and fluvial sandstone and conglomerate. Palagonitic tuff and breccia grade laterally into altered and unaltered basalt flows of unit Tob. In places includes layers of fluvial conglomerate and, in parts of the Deschutes-Umatilla Plateau, extensive deposits of fanglomerate composed mostly of Miocene basalt debris and silt. Also includes thin, welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuffs. Vertebrate and plant fossils indicate rocks of unit are mostly of Clarendonian and Hemphillian (late Miocene and Pliocene) age. Potassium-argon ages on interbedded basalt flows and ash-flow tuffs range from about 4 to 10 Ma. Includes the Drewsey Formation of Shotwell and others (1963); sedimentary parts of the Rattlesnake Formation of Brown and Thayer (1966); an interstratified ash-flow tuff has been radiometrically dated by potassium-argon methods at about 6.6 Ma (see Fiebelkorn and others, 1983); Bully Creek Formation of Kittleman and others (1967); Dalles Formation of Newcomb (1966, 1969); Shutler Formation of Hodge (1932), McKay beds of Hogenson (1964) and Newcomb (1966) (see also Shotwell, 1956); Kern Basin Formation of Corcoran and others (1962); Rome beds of Baldwin (1976); parts of the (now obsolete) Danforth Formation of Piper and others (1939), Idaho Group of Malde and Powers (1962), Thousand Creek Beds of Merriam (1910); the Madras (or Deschutes) Formation, the "Simtustus formation" of Smith (1984), and the Yonna Formation (Newcomb, 1958). In areas west of Cascade crest, includes the Sandy River Mudstone and the Troutdale Formation of Trimble (1963) and the lower Pliocene Helvetia Formation of Schlicker and Deacon (1967)
Tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, tuffs, pumicites, and silicic flows (Miocene) (Miocene)
Moderately well indurated lacustrine and fluvial (flood-plain) deposits of tuff, pumicite, palagonite tuff, and lesser siltstone, arkosic sandstone, and pebble and cobble conglomerate. Locally contains some lignite beds. Former glass in silicic vitroclastic debris commonly crystallized and altered to secondary silica minerals, alkali feldspar, zeolites, and clay minerals. Contains some welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuffs, and minor rhyolite flows. Widespread and abundant vertebrate fossils and minor plant fossils indicate that most of unit is of middle Miocene (Barstovian) age; parts of unit between Goose Lake and Warner Valley may include rocks of early Miocene age. Locally interlayered with and locally overlies basalt and andesite flows of unit Tmb. Overlies and locally interfingers with Picture Gorge Basalt (Thayer and Brown, 1966) and with Miocene basalt south of Prineville. Includes Mascall Formation of Merriam (1901), Sucker (Succor) Creek Formation of Corcoran and others (1962) and Kittleman and others (1967), Drip Spring Formation of Kittleman and others (1965, 1967), Trout Creek Formation of Smith (1926), and "rocks of Miocene age" of Malde and Powers (1962) in the southern Owyhee Upland province. In southeast Oregon, some of these rocks represent caldera and moat-fill deposits
Tyee Formation (middle Eocene) (Middle Eocene)
Very thick sequence of rhymically bedded, medium- to fine-grained micaceous, feldspathic, lithic, or arkosic marine sandstone and micaceous carbonaceous siltstone; contains minor interbeds of dacite tuff in upper part. Foraminiferal fauna are referred to the Ulatisian Stage (Snavely and others, 1964). Groove and flute casts indicate deposition by north-flowing turbidity currents (Snavely and others, 1964), but probable provenance of unit is southwest Idaho (Heller and others, 1985)
Undifferentiated tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, tuffs, and basalt (Miocene and Oligocene) (Oligocene to Miocene)
Heterogeneous assemblage of continental, largely volcanogenic deposits of basalt and basaltic andesite, including flows and breccia, complexly interstratified with epiclastic and volcaniclastic deposits of basaltic to rhyodacitic composition. Includes extensive rhyodacitic to andesitic ash-flow and air-fall tuffs, abundant lapilli tuff and tuff breccia, andesitic to dacitic mudflow (lahar) deposits, poorly bedded to well-bedded, fine- to coarse-grained tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, and volcanic conglomerate. Originally included in Little Butte Volcanic Series (Peck and others, 1964); includes Mehama Volcanics and Breitenbush Tuffs or Series of Thayer (1933, 1936, 1939), Breitenbush Formation of Hammond and others (1982), Mehama Formation of Eubanks (1960), and Molalla Formation of Miller and Orr (1984a). In Columbia River Gorge, includes Miocene and older rocks previously assigned to the Skamania Volcanic Series (Trimble, 1963), or to the Eagle Creek Formation (Waters, 1973). Lower parts of unit exhibit low-grade metamorphism with primary constituents altered to clay minerals, calcite, zeolites (stilbite, laumontite, heulandite), and secondary silica minerals. In contact aureoles adjacent to stocks and larger dikes of granitic and dioritic composition or in areas of andesitic dike swarms, both wallrocks and intrusions are pervasively propylitized; locally rocks also have been subjected to potassic alteration. Epiclastic part of assemblage locally contains fossil plants assigned to the Angoonian Stage (Wolfe, 1981) or of Oligocene age. A regionally extensive biotite-quartz rhyodacite ash-flow tuff, the ash-flow tuff of Bond Creek of Smith and others (1982), is exposed in southern part of Western Cascade Range near and at base of unit. A K-Ar age of 34.9 Ma was determined on biotite from the tuff (Smith, 1980). Ash-flow tuffs, higher in the section and in the same area, have been radiometrically dated at 22 to 32 Ma by potassium-argon methods (J.G. Smith, unpublished data; Evernden and James, 1964; Fiebelkorn and others, 1983). In the central part of the Western Cascade Range, the unit has yielded a number of K-Ar ages in the range of about 32 to 19 Ma (Verplanck, 1985, p. 53-54). A fission-track age of 23.8 +/- 1.4 Ma was obtained on a red, crystal-rich ash-flow tuff (J.A. Vance, oral communication, 1983) collected at an elevation of about 3,000 ft on U.S. Highway 20 west-southwest of Echo Mountain. Most ages from basalt and basaltic andesite lava flows are in the range of about 35 to 18 Ma. Locally intruded by small stocks of granitoid rocks and by dikes, sills, plugs, and invasive flows of basaltic andesite and basalt; in many places, the intrusions are indistinguishable from poorly exposed interbedded lava flows; K-Ar ages on several of the mafic intrusions or invasive flows are about 27 to 31 Ma. In places subdivided into Tus, Tut, and Tub
Yamhill Formation and related rocks (upper and middle Eocene) (Middle Eocene to Late Eocene)
Massive to thin-bedded concretionary marine siltstone and thin interbeds of arkosic, glauconitic, and basaltic sandstone; locally contains interlayered basalt lava flows and lapilli tuff. Foraminiferal assemblages in siltstone referred to the Ulatisian and lower Narizian Stages (Snavely and others, 1969; McKeel, 1980) Includes the Elkton Formation of Baldwin (1974; also see Beaulieu and Hughes, 1975), which consists of thin-bedded siltstone and minor sandstone interbeds
Yaquina Formation (lower Miocene and upper Oligocene) (Late Oligocene to Early Miocene)
Thick- to thin-bedded sandstone, conglomerate, and tuffaceous siltstone of deltaic origin; locally contains thin coal and ash beds. Conglomerate contains abundant clasts of pumice and dacitic volcanic rocks. In places includes thick lenses of marine tuffaceous siltstone and fine-grained sandstone. Foraminifers in formation assigned to the Zemorrian and lower part of the Saucesian Stages of Kleinpell (1938) and molluscan fauna to the lower Blakeley Stage of Weaver and others (1944)
Rhode Island
Conanicut Group - East Passage Formation (Cambro-Ordovician)
Conanicut Group - East Passage Formation - Red, orange-brown, and gray-green phyllite and thinly-bedded, nongraded sandstone and siltstone; rare limestone, and sparse volcanic rock including welded-tuff.
Conanicut Group - undifferentiated rock (Cambro-Ordovician)
Conanicut Group - undifferentiated rock - Consists of associations of the above rock types.
Newport Group - Price Neck Formation (Late Proterozoic? or older?)
Newport Group - Price Neck Formation - Fine-grained graded beds of feldspathic siltstone and sandstone, interstratified with carbonate conglomerate, and ash-flow and lapilli tuff; some units may be lahar deposits.
Scituate Igneous Suite - volcaniclastic rock (Devonian)
Scituate Igneous Suite - volcaniclastic rock - Dark-gray, pink, greenish, and purplish tuff and epiclastic rock (sandstone, breccia, conglomerate) containing abundant volcanic detritus. Tuff may include ignimbrite and ash-flow tuff. Fiamme common in some rock mapped formerly as Spencer Hill Volcanics.
Texas
Allamore Formation (preCambrian-Proterozoic [Grenville])
Allamore Formation
Black Gap area volcanic rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene)
Black Gap area volcanic rocks
Catahoula Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
Catahoula Formation
Catahoula Formation and Frio Clay, undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
Catahoula Formation and Frio Clay, undivided
Chinati Mountains caldera volcanic rocks, including Chinati Mountains Group, Mitchell Mesa Ignimbrite, and type area of Petan Basalt (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
Chinati Mountains caldera volcanic rocks, including Chinati Mountains Group, Mitchell Mesa Ignimbrite, and type area of Petan Basalt
Chisos Formation of Schiebout et al (1987) and the Big Yellow Sandstone Member of their Tornillo Formation, undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene Oligocene)
Chisos Formation of Schiebout et al (1987) and the Big Yellow Sandstone Member of their Tornillo Formation, undivided
Delaho and Rawls Formations, undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene Miocene)
Delaho and Rawls Formations, undivided NOTE: This unit is represented within the map unit explanation of (Geol. Map of Texas, 1992, Bur. Econ. Geol.) but does not occur on the map and is NOT included in the spatial data.
Devils Graveyard volcanic rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene Oligocene)
Devils Graveyard volcanic rocks
Duff Formation, Decie Member from Paisano caldera (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene-Early)
Duff Formation, Decie Member from Paisano caldera
Duff Formation (with Decie Member from Paisano caldera shown separately), Cottonwood Springs Basalt, Potato Hill Andesite, Sheep Canyon Basalt, Crossen Trachyte, and Pruett Formation, undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene-Late Oligocene-Early)
Duff Formation (with Decie Member from Paisano caldera shown separaetly), Cottonwood Springs Basalt, Potato Hill Andesite, Sheep Canyon Basalt, Crossen Trachyte, and Pruett Formation, undivided
Eagle Ford Formation and Woodbine Formations, undivided (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Eagle Ford Formation and Woodbine Formations, undivided
Eagle Mountains caldera volcanic rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
Eagle Mountains caldera volcanic rocks
Infiernito caldera volcanic rocks including Capote Mountain Tuff, Tsh2 of Shely Group, Buckshot Ignimbrite, and Tm1 of Morita Ranch Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene-Late)
Infiernito caldera volcanic rocks including Capote Mountain Tuff, Tsh2 of Shely Group, Buckshot Ignimbrite, and Tm1 of Morita Ranch Formation
Perdiz Conglomerate, Tascotal Formation, and tuffaceous sediments of Fresno Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
Perdiz Conglomerate, Tascotal Formation, and tuffaceous sediments of Fresno Formation
Tarantula Gravel (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene)
Tarantula Gravel
Van Horn Mountains caldera volcanic rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
Van Horn Mountains caldera volcanic rocks
Vieja Group, including Bracks Rhyolite, Chambers and Colmena Tuffs and Gill Breccia (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene Oligocene)
Vieja Group, including Bracks Rhyolite, Chambers and Colmena Tuffs and Gill Breccia
Wiley Mountain caldera volcanic rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
Wiley Mountain caldera volcanic rocks
Woodbine Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Woodbine Formation
younger volcanic rocks of Davis Mountains area including Brooks Mountain, Goat Canyon, Medley, Barrel Springs, Wild Cherry, Eppenaurer Ranch, Mount Locke, and Merrill Formations (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene-Early)
younger volcanic rocks of Davis Mountains area including Brooks Mountain, Goat Canyon, Medley, Barrel Springs, Wild Cherry, Eppenaurer Ranch, Mount Locke, and Merrill Formations
Utah
Tertiary (1) sedimentary rocks in southwestern Utah (Late Paleocene to Early Oligocene)
Tertiary (2) sedimentary rocks in central Utah (Eocene)
Tertiary (2) sedimentary rocks in Salt Lake City-Coalville-Randolph region (Eocene)
Tertiary (2) sedimentary rocks in southwestern Utah (Eocene)
Tertiary (2) sedimentary rocks in Uinta Mountains-Uinta Basin region (Eocene)
Virginia
Chopawamsic Formation - Mafic to intermediate metavolcanic rocks (Cambrian)
Chopawamsic Formation - Mafic to intermediate metavolcanic rocks
Vermont
Albee Formation (Ordovician)
Albee Formation - Massive, gray, white-weathered quartzite and feldspathic quartzite interbedded with greenish-gray slate, phyllite, feldspthic phyllite and quartzose argillaceous phyllite. Micaceous quartzite, quartz-mica schist, mica schist and hornfels contining porphyroblasts of biotite, garnet, staurolite and sillimanite in the vicinity of granitic plutons. Soda-rhyolite tuff occurs locally. Micaceous quartzite characterized by thin, schistose "pinstripe" partings is common in many areas.
Ammonoosuc Volcanics (Ordovician)
Ammonoosuc Volcanics - Soda-rhyolite tuff, breccia, and flows. (Northeastern Vermont).
Partridge Formation (Ordovician)
Partridge Formation - Dull gray to sooty black carbonaceous slate and phyllite; mostly fissile, but locally massive and tough. Contains a few beds of both schistose and massive soda-rhyolite tuff (not shown on map). (Northeastern Vermont).
Volcanic breccia, felsitic tuff, and flows. (Permian-Triassic)
Volcanic breccia, felsitic tuff, and flows.
Washington
Eocene nonmarine rocks (Eocene)
Predominantly sandstone and shale. Includes some conglomerate in the Cle Elum area in Kittilas County. Contains extensive coal seams near Roslyn and carbonaceous shale and coal beds in White Pass area. Contains tuff beds in northwestern Ferry County.
Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks (Eocene-Oligocene)
Predominantly light-green, bedded andesite breccia with interbedded andesite and basalt flows, mudflows, and tuff beds; becomes more tuffaceous near top of unit. Includes tuffaceous and arkosic sandstone, shale, and carbonaceous shale beds in central and southern Cascade Mountians. Rhyodacite and quartz latite flows in northwestern Ferry County.
Lower upper Eocene marine and nonmarine rocks (Eocene)
Predominantly massive to well-bedded tuffaceous marine siltstone with interbedded arkosic and basaltic sandstone. Includes conglomerate in King County and along north side of Olympic Peninsula. Minor lava flows and breccia in western Lewis County and eastern Grays Harbor County. Coal seams in central Lewis County and north-central Pierce County.
Miocene nonmarine rocks (Late Miocene)
Poorly to moderately consolidated tuffaceous sandstone, conglomerate, siltstone, and claystone in western Washington. Chiefly clay and shale with minor sand, gravel, and diatomaceous earth near Spokane. Includes diatomite beds near Yakima and Quincy, and some marine beds in Western Washington.
Oligocene marine rocks (Late Eocene to Late Oligocene)
Massive, tuffaceous and nontuffaceous sandstone and siltstone; locally concretionary; includes conglomerate along the north coast of Olympic Peninsula and basaltic sandstone east of Chehalis.
Oligocene-Miocene marine rocks (Oligocene)
Massive to thin-bedded, coarse-grained sandstone, conglomerate, conglomeratic sandstone, shale, and sandy shale.
Oligocene nonmarine rocks (Oligocene)
Andesite conglomerate, tuff beds, and mudflow material. Includes some interbedded andesite flows in Columbia River Gorge. Lake sediments with Oligocene flora in Republic area in Ferry County. Massive tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone with beds of coal and high-alumina clay in Castle Rock-Toledo coal district in Cowlitz and Lewis Counties; include local interbedded basalt flows and some marine and late Eocene rocks.
Paleocene-Cretaceous nonmarine rocks (Eocene (see age coding))
Brown-gray to light-gray, medium- to course-grained massive cross-bedded arkose with interbedded conglomerate and siltstone. Contains several coal seams in Whatcom County. Iron-rich laterite at base near Cle Elum and Blewett Pass in Kittitas and Chelan Counties.
Permian rocks (Permian-Triassic)
Conglomerate, graywacke, siltstone, argillite and interbedded fossiliferous limestone, greenstone, and minor angular conglomerate in northwestern Stevens and Ferry Counties. Impure quartzite, sandstone, graywacke, greenstone, ribbon chert, chert breccia, and limestone in Snohomish County and on San Juan Island. Lower Permian limestone on Black Mountain in northwestern Whatcom County. Middle Permian rocks in northeastern Washington.
Tertiary nonmarine rocks, undivided (Tertiary; mostly Eocene)
Sandstone, shale, conglomerate, agglomerate, and tuff; includes some lava flows. Massive conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, and ferruginous shale in northwestern Whatcom County.
Upper Eocene volcanic rocks (Late Eocene)
Predominantly andesite flows and breccia; includes some basalt flows. Contains basaltic conglomerate, pyroclastic rocks, tuff beds, and sandstone in Chehalis-Centralia coal district, Lewis County.
Upper Eocene volcanic rocks (Late Eocene to Oligocene)
Predominantly basalt flows and flow breccia; includes some pyroclastic and andesite rocks. Chiefly in western Washington.
Wisconsin
Felsic metavolcanic rocks of 1835- to 1845-Ma age group (Early Proterozoic)
Felsic metavolcanic rocks of 1835- to 1845-Ma age group - Rhyolite to dacite and, locally, andesite tuff, breccia, and minor sedimentary rocks, including conglomerate. Exposed in central Wisconsin.
Felsic volcanic and volcanogenic rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Felsic volcanic and volcanogenic rocks - Tuff, argillite, graywacke, and minor volcanic rocks of lower greenschist-facies in southern Rusk County. Could be younger in age than adjacent metavolcanic rocks.
Metabasalt (Late Archean) (Late Archean)
Metabasalt (Late Archean) - Derived from mafic to intermediate pyroclastic rocks and massive to pillowed lava flows. Unit mapped as Ramsey Formation by Prinz (1981) south of Gogebic Range; mapped as Mona Schist and Kitchi Schist in northern complex of Marquette District.
Rhyolite at and near Cary Mound and near Brokaw (about 1835 Ma) (Early Proterozoic)
Rhyolite at and near Cary Mound and near Brokaw (about 1835 Ma) - Flow-banded rhyolite, welded tuff, volcanic conglomerate, and volcanogenic sedimentary rocks. Exposed in both Pembine-Wausau and Marshfield terranes.
Wyoming
Colter Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene)
COLTER FORMATION--Dull-green and gray tuff, volcanic conglomerate, and sandstone.
Huckleberry Ridge Tuff of Yellowstone Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Pliocene)
HUCKLEBERRY RIDGE TUFF OF YELLOWSTONE GROUP (AGE SLIGHTLY MORE THAN 2 Ma)--Lavender to gray-brown welded rhyolite tuff.
Rhyolite flows, tuff, and intrusive igneous rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
RHYOLITE FLOWS, TUFF, AND INTRUSIVE IGNEOUS ROCKS--Includes Plateau Rhyolite (age about 0.07 Ma) and interlayered sediments, Mount Jackson Rhyolite (age 0.6 to about 1 Ma), Lewis Canyon Rhyolite (age about 0.9 Ma); and Lava Creek Tuff of Yellowstone Group (age 0.6 to about 1 Ma).

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